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Surin silks are famous for their intricate designs made by the tying and dyeing process called mat mee (มัดหมี่). Some women are mat mee specialists and choose to focus on this stage of the silk making process, designing and tying…

This image depicts what weavers refer to as laai prayuk (ลายประยุกต์) or “applied/adapted patterns.” The name signifies that these patterns have been adapted from traditional versions or are completely original designs;…

This pattern, shown here in two naturally dyed color variations, is known as laai an luui seem (ลายอันลูยฃีม). The story of this pattern was told by Nongyao Songwitcha, who said that the tale was passed to her by her mother.…

In this image, members of Ajaan Surachote’s weaving group are conducting their annual wai khru (ไหว้ครู) ceremony at Ajaan Surachote’s home. As the women chant blessings, they also call out their wishes in Thai and Khmer, asking…

The pattern to the right of this photograph is known generally today as hol, but it is also called hol saraei (โฮลแสร็ย), and the pattern to the left is named hol phroh (โฮลปร็อฮ). Hol proh is a mat mee pattern with…

This pattern is known as hol, and is referred to by many Surin locals as the “queen of Surin silk.” Hol is woven only in ethnic Khmer communities in Surin, and most weavers assert that the name hol comes from the Khmer word hor (โฮร), which…

The patterns in these images are nearly identical, yet the piece of silk to the right is over 100 years old and was purchased in Cambodia, and the piece to the left was created this year by Surachote Tamcharoen in Surin. The central pattern on both…

Very little is wasted in the process of silk production. Scraps of chewed-up leaves and worm excrement are used as natural fertilizer, and some people even turn the worm excrement into a healthful chlorophyll drink. Once the silk is extracted, the…

A woman demonstrates silk extraction at the Queen Sirikit Sericulture Center. One cocoon holds up to 1,000 meters of silk filament.